A View on Scripture
By |   August 1, 2013 |   in Scripture |   1 Comment

‘Thomas Merton said it was actually dangerous to put the Scriptures in the hands of people whose inner self is not yet sufficiently awakened to encounter the Spirit, because they will try to use God for their own egocentric purposes. (This is why religion is so subject to corruption!) Now, if we are going to talk about conversion and penance, let me apply that to the two major groups that have occupied Western Christianity—Catholics and Protestants. Neither one has really let the Word of God guide their lives.

Catholics need to be converted to giving the Scriptures some actual authority in their lives. Luther wasn’t wrong when he said that most Catholics did not read the Bible. Most Catholics are still not that interested in the Bible. (Historically they did not have the printing press, nor could most people read, so you can’t blame them entirely.) I have been a priest for 42 years now, and I would sadly say that most Catholics would rather hear quotes from saints, Popes, and bishops, the current news, or funny stories, if they are to pay attention. If I quote strongly from the Sermon on the Mount, they are almost throwaway lines. I can see Catholics glaze over because they have never read the New Testament, much less studied it, or been guided by it. I am very sad to have to admit this. It is the Achilles heel of much of the Catholic world, priests included. (The only good thing about it is that they never fight you like Protestants do about Scripture. They are easily duped, and the hierarchy has been able to take advantage of this.)

Discount for Bloggers

If Catholics need to be converted, Protestants need to do penance. Their shout of “sola Scriptura” (only Scripture) has left them at the mercy of their own cultures, their own limited education, their own prejudices, and their own selective reading of some texts while avoiding others. Partly as a result, slavery, racism, sexism, classism, xenophobia, and homophobia have lasted authoritatively into our time—by people who claim to love Jesus! I think they need to do penance for what they have often done with the Bible! They largely interpreted the Bible in a very individualistic and otherworldly way. It was “an evacuation plan for the next world” to use Brian McLaren’s phrase—and just for their group. Most of Evangelical Protestantism has no cosmic message, no social message, and little sense of social justice or care for the outsider. Both Catholics and Protestants (Orthodox too!) found a way to do our own thing while posturing friendship with Jesus.’  Fr. Richard Rohr

Generally, one does not begin a blog post with an extended quote from someone else. However, in this case, Fr. Richard’s assessment of the use of the Bible describes exactly what I needed to be delivered from. About 17 years ago, I went through a major faith crisis. That story is too long to recount here. Suffice it to say, I was using Scripture to mold God into my own image. I needed to learn to worship Christ and not the Bible.

Certainly, Christ is shown to me in the Bible but I am now freer to follow the leading of the Holy Spirit. “Rooted in Scripture” is different than being choked by it. The only “proof text,” I now need is to love God and my neighbors as myself. This has given me a freedom I had never had before. It has also commanded a responsibility to walk closer to Jesus than ever before.

Join the Conversation

What reaction did you have to the quote by Fr. Richard Rohr?

How do you perceive scripture through your personal believes?

Valerie Hess:
Valerie-Hess-low-resValerie Hess is an author, instructor in the Spring Arbor University’s Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation and Leadership (MSFL) program, retreat speaker, musician, mother and pastor’s wife. She does a weekly blog at www.valeriehess.com and has written numerous articles, mostly on the themes of spiritual formation through the spiritual disciplines and church music. She has written three books: Habits of a Child’s Heart: Raising Your Kids with the Spiritual Disciplines (co-authored with Dr. Marti Watson Garlett), Spiritual Disciplines Devotional: A Year of Readings and The Life of the Body: Physical Well-Being and Spiritual Formation" (co-authored with Lane M. Arnold). Her husband is an Associate Pastor at First Presbyterian Church in Boulder, CO. She has two daughters.

1 Comment


  1. Your (actually Richard’s) opening citation of Merton is what drew me in. I’ve gone thru Fr. Richard’s menswork/intensive formation program, the Men’s Rites of Passage, so I suppose you’re preaching to the choir with me, but I’ll agree it is a matter of freedom vs. discipline, post-modernism vs. respect for tradition –a tricky balance. I’m a cradle Catholic, but Protestant (mainline, pentecostal, mega-evangelical) and most of all *Mennonite* thru my 20s and 30s, now drawing upon all three and more (including some Orthodox or eastern non-Christian practices or principles). It’s a hard road to walk, this in-between place, submitting to the Spirit and not throwing anyone under the bus, but it is leading somewhere very good. But because of the appeal of mainstream culture, and groupthink and safety, versus the “slippery slopes” that everyone warns about on both sides of the aisle, this hybrid existence and respecting Scripture (without making it into an idol) is a pretty lonely road at times. I’m always with one foot in a non-unified place with whatever community I choose to explore these scriptural questions with. As Father Rohr has also said in the past: “The prophet belongs on the edge of the inside.” — Mark in Chicago

Leave a Reply

*